CSUN Baseball to Establish ‘Diamond University’ Life Skills Program

NORTHRIDGE, Calif. –

Being a collegiate baseball player takes more than just putting in time on the field and in the weight room. In addition to practices and games a student-athlete must also excel in the classroom and in the community, but balancing all of these requirements takes skill and determination.

To help his players meet the rigorous day-to-day challenges posed by being a Division I baseball student-athlete, Cal State Northridge head coach Greg Moore will institute "Diamond University," a life skills and personal development course for baseball players at CSUN.

"Over the past 7 years the DU program has been building with great results," said Moore. "I am excited to bring it to CSUN where we can share the message with our athletes and the community about life and sports. We want to give perspective on what it means to be an athlete. At the same time let's build an increased appreciation for the day-to-day life of a Division I baseball player."

While the program will be setup as a course for CSUN baseball players other students on campus, as well as younger members of the community, professors, administrators and coaches, are invited to participate. The 10-week course will be based on The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen R. Covey and will focus on goal setting, active listening, communication skills and time management.

Although similar to the NCAA's CHAMPS/Life Skills program, Diamond University is very specific to baseball players in that it is built on examining the skills needed to excel in every aspect of a college baseball player's daily schedule. By using "The 7 Habits" as a guide, participants will be able to draw a clear connection between their lives and the skills they are working to develop.

Included in the course will be presentations from former student-athletes, as well as community members. The CSUN baseball team will also reach out to local high school students and others in the area that are interested in learning more about being a student-athlete and developing the life skills that will help them be successful as they move forward in life.

Ultimately, the goal for Diamond University is to tie in how each and every action off the field translates to success on the field and how the skills needed to succeed in one mirror those needed for the other.

"The results show up on the field because in the 20 hours per day that our student-athletes are not baseball players, we realize that everything we do matters and every rep counts," added Moore. "When student-athletes are on the field or in the classroom, they have a clear and focused mind, understanding how to achieve success and learn from failure.  One day I want to see a Diamond U center here in Northridge, a place where students of all interests can learn life lessons through sports."